TfL shrugs off haulage industry concerns over new Direct Vision Standards, RHA claims
Photo credits @ Sam Saunders/ Flickr

TfL shrugs off haulage industry concerns over new Direct Vision Standards, RHA claims

The Road Haulage Association (RHA) and Logistics UK have voiced their disappointment with the newly unveiled Direct Vision Standard (DVS) by Transport for London (TfL). The industry leaders argue that the latest DVS iteration fails to address their previously raised concerns, adding to the mounting apprehensions among hauliers.

You can read this article in 2 minutes

Pölös Zsófia

Pölös Zsófia

Journalist Trans.info

06.09.2023

The Road Haulage Association (RHA) and Logistics UK have voiced their disappointment with the newly unveiled Direct Vision Standard (DVS) by Transport for London (TfL). The industry leaders argue that the latest DVS iteration fails to address their previously raised concerns, adding to the mounting apprehensions among hauliers.

TfL shrugs off haulage industry concerns over new Direct Vision Standards, RHA claims
Photo credits @ Sam Saunders/ Flickr

In a joint press release, RHA and Logistics UK expressed that while both organizations are committed to enhancing road safety and implementing effective measures to reduce the risk of road fatalities, they contend that the proposed changes to the DVS scheme pose significant challenges.

Under the new DVS regulations set to be enforced from October 2024, HGV operators will be required to adhere to stricter safety standards, potentially necessitating the replacement of existing equipment.

The primary concerns raised by the RHA and Logistics UK centre around the absence of regulatory oversight from TfL and the lack of an accreditation process for the revised standards. This uncertainty leaves hauliers in a difficult position, as they attempt to navigate the impending changes without clear guidelines.

“The industry is eager to support the Mayor’s Vision Zero road safety strategy and continuously improve the safe operation of vehicles. However, the short lead-in times, the scarcity of available equipment, and a severe shortage of qualified fitters present insurmountable obstacles to preparing for these changes,” the industry groups stated in their press release.

One of the pressing issues highlighted by the haulage industry is the potential need to replace equipment that has already been installed in good faith to meet the current „safe system” but may not align with the revised DVS standard. TfL has not provided a clear rationale for such replacements, leaving hauliers and operators in a state of uncertainty, the organisations stress.

In addition to the practical challenges, the lack of clarity also poses questions for equipment manufacturers and suppliers who must understand their customers’ requirements to meet the anticipated demand.

Hauliers call for regulatory certainty, comprehensive guidelines, and assurance that further changes will not be necessary once new equipment is installed. This clarity is crucial for industry stakeholders to make informed decisions about planning, investment, and compliance with the evolving DVS.

Trending articles

Share
Trending articles