Denmark: truck tolls to be linked to level of CO2 emissions

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From 2025, truck tolls in Denmark will vary according to how much CO2 a vehicle emits. The Danish Government says the agreement is another step on the way to achieving its goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 70% by 2030.

Denmark: truck tolls to be linked to level of CO2 emissions
Photo: Lav Ulv / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

In a statement, the Danish Transport Ministry confirmed the change is to take place from 2025. It is believed the 2025 date will give hauliers and businesses the time they need to adapt. It is estimated the truck toll plan could reduce CO2 emissions by as much as 0.3 million tonnes in 2025 and 0.4 million tons in 2030.

Commenting on the agreement, which was comfortably voted through by Danish parliamentarians, Jeppe Bruus, Denmark’s Minister of Taxation, said:

“We must have more green trucks on Danish roads that emit less CO2 for the benefit of our climate and environment. Therefore, it is absolutely necessary that we reorganize our taxes so that the polluter pays more. Therefore, I am well satisfied with today’s agreement on a kilometer-based toll for lorries, which ensures that in the future, tolls must be paid depending on how much CO2 the truck emits and how far you drive.”

The Danish Transport Ministry added that its kilometre-based tax means that the costs truck traffic entails in the form of accidents, noise, air pollution and contributions to congestion, will be covered to a greater extent than today.

The aforementioned tax will apply from 1 January 2025, when Denmark will also withdraw from its existing period-based road tax for trucks (Eurovignette). In addition, the agreement includes an amendment to rules on the weight and dimensions of lorries, as well as initiatives to boost rail freight in the country.

“We are in a situation where there is already a shortage of drivers and we know that we will have to save on fossil fuels in the coming years – both for the sake of the climate and our dependence on oil. Therefore, it is common sense to give the industry opportunities to transport more goods with an individual truck,” said Trine Bramsen, Denmark’s Minister of Transport.

The precise changes to the weight and dimensions Bramsen refers to can be found here.


Photo: Lav Ulv / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

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